StarMusicFestival
Opus III - Opus III & Friends Album

Opus III - Opus III & Friends Album

Genre: Jazz / Rock
Performer: Opus III
Album: Opus III & Friends
Released: 1970
Style: Psychedelic Rock, Acid Rock, Jazz-Rock
MP3 version ZIP size: 1165 mb
FLAC version ZIP size: 2528 mb
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 268

Tracklist


Evening Dream
Natural Talking Boy
General Mojo's Well Laid Plan
Juice Of Joy
6.30 A Sunday Morning
Movements Of 8.08 Time-series
I See The World From My Window
Deserted Child

Versions


CategoryArtistTitle (Format)LabelCategoryCountryYear
SLP-2508Opus III Opus III & Friends ‎(LP, Album)SonetSLP-2508Sweden1970
SLP-2508Opus III Opus III & Friends ‎(LP, Album, Ltd, RE, Num)SonetSLP-2508Europe2013

Album Info


Opus III & Friends - Opus III, Friends. Лента с персональными рекомендациями и музыкальными новинками, радио, подборки на любой вкус, удобное управление своей коллекцией. Opus III & Friends. UMG от лица компании Universal Music AB Muserk Rights Management. Формируйте собственную коллекцию записей Opus free to Opus III Opus III & Friends A Sunday Morning, General Mojo's Well Laid Plan and more. 8 tracks 35:03. Dance charts. The group consisted of vocalist Kirsty Hawkshaw and producersmusicians Kevin Dodds, Ian Munro and Nigel Walton. The group members promoted a strong environmental and feminist message through their lyrics, album liner notes and photo and video imagery. Their biggest hit was It's a Fine Day, which reached number five in the United Kingdom in February 1992. Opus III or Opus 3 may refer to: Opus 3 of various composers, particularly Arcangelo Corelli and Geminiani. Opus-3 Lithuanian National Radio and Television. Opus 3 Artists. Opus III band III opus III friends. 14 results found. Filters : Items on sale Mint Sellers Professional sellers Private sellers. opus iii 2 opus iii & friends. Sonet - - SLP-2508. Opus III Фото исполнителя Opus III. United Kingdom. состав: Kirsty Hawkshaw, Ian Munro, Kevin Dodds, Nigel Walton. All songs by Opus III. added date. It's A Fine Day Unavailable. Все песни исполнителя Opus iii Вы можете скачать бесплатно в mp3-формате, либо слушайте песню Opus III - It s a Fine Day, Opus III - It s a Fine Day, Opus III - Dreaming Of Now, а также рингтоны на звонок и все новые треки. Opus iii. Скачивай бесплатно песни Opus iii в mp3 отличного качества 320 kbps на свой мобильный телефон или ПК, а также слушайте их онлайн на сайте . Opus III - Outro 00:29. Klasik Müzik Akademi - Ludwig van Beethoven, Piano Sonata 09 opus 14 06:27. The Relaxing Sound of the Piano - Scenes from Childhood, Opus 15 1838 - curious story 04:57. Klasik Müzik Akademi - Robert Schumann, Album for the Young: Opus 68 1848 Knecht Reprecht 08:10. Ensemble Vocal d'Erguël, Opus Chœur de Chambre, Lyrica Neuchâtel, OSJ Symphonic, Philippe Krüttli, Facundo Agudin - Requiem: III. Dies irae 02:15. Mogens Ellegaard - In the Zoo, opus 164, Promenade I, The Ostrich II The Elephant ,III The Sea-Lion, IV Tea with the Cockatoos, V The Dromedary, VI Monkeyes 07:56

Performer


Opus III: English electronic music group who had success on the UK Singles Chart and on the U. Dance charts. The group consisted of vocalist Kirsty Hawkshaw and producersmusicians Kevin Dodds, Ian Munro and Nigel Walton. The group members promoted a strong environmental and feminist message through their lyrics, album liner notes and photo and video imagery. Their biggest hit was It's a Fine Day, which reached number five in the United Kingdom in February 1992. It's a Fine Day, I Talk to the Wind, Sea People и другие песни. Opus III or Opus 3 may refer to: Opus 3 of various composers, particularly Arcangelo Corelli and Geminiani. Opus-3 Lithuanian National Radio and Television. Opus 3 Artists. Opus III band to music from Opus III like It's a Fine Day, I Talk to the Wind & more. Find the latest tracks, albums, and images from Opus III. Opus III was a techno and house music group from England who had major success on the UK singles charts and on the U. Dance chart. The group consisted of vocalist Kirsty Hawkshaw and producersmusicians Kevin Dobbs, Ian Munro and Nigel Walton. The group members also promoted a strong environmental message through their lyrics, album liner notes and photo and video imagery. Opus III was an English electronic music group who had success on the UK Singles Chart and on the U. Opus 3 Artists, New York, NY. Самые новые твиты от Opus III Music opusiii: Toshio Akiyama, legendary Japanese conductor, recently performed and recorded Don Quixote by Robert W. We are honored. Opus III had a few hit songs in the early-'90s ambient house scene before lead vocalist Kirsty Hawkshaw embarked on a successful venture later on in the decade as a freelance vocalist, working with some of dance music's most successful artists. The group's debut album for Atlantic, Mind Fruit 1992, featured the popular songs It's a Fine Day and I Talk to the Wind. Opus III: It's a Fine Day Composer. Show all Hide all . 1994 RockVideo Monthly TV Series performer - 1 episode. Alternative Releases: August 1994 1994. performer: When You Made the Mountain. 1992 Motormouth TV Series performer - 1 episode. Episode 1992. performer: It's A Fine Day. 1992 Opus III: It's a Fine Day Video short. 1994 RockVideo Monthly TV Series Themselves. Check out Opus III on Beatport. Welcome to Beatport. Beatport is the world's largest electronic music store for DJs. Изучите релизы лейбла Opus 3 Records. Выясните, что отсутствует в вашей дискографии, и приобретите релизы лейбла Opus 3 Records. Opus 3 is an independent Swedish record company and audiophile label specialist, associated with Bo Hansson 7 and Jan-Eric Persson, which is dedicated to recording timeless acoustic music such as jazz, blues, folk and classical music. The company's aim is to reproduce voices and instruments as naturally and accurately as possible. To attain this they choose recording environments with good natural ambience

Video


Comments:
Malien
This is a wonderful review that was on an ebay listing from 2007 NOT WRITTEN BY ME. Author unknown.

"This is why I hate labels. Not that this uber-rare Swedish album from 1970 by Opus III and Friends shows up very often – you’re likely to see six dozen original pressings of the July album for every one of these, and that’s not an exaggeration – but when it does, record dealers always – and I mean, always – label it “progressive rock.” Now I don’t know about you, but when I think prog-rock, I think of long instrumental passages, intricate time signatures and music that often incorporates elements of classical works and/or jazz fusion. Opus III and Friend’s first song, “6:30 A Sunday Morning” filches bits from two Cream songs in the first minute, and then references the Beatles. Now if that’s prog rock, then Roger Dean shoulda designed the cover for “Disraeli Gears.”

I’ll give you bands like the Nice and Flaming Youth, and albums like Yes’s “Time and A Word” – you could slap either a “prog” or a “psych” label on those and make a case both ways. And I’ll also concede that Opus III and Friends’ album came out in 1970, that notoriously transitional year between both genres. But one listen to this album and you’ll hear influences from Cream, the Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, Pink Floyd, the Yardbirds and Santana, only one of which you might classify as prog rock. Besides, the Swedes were always a little behind the trends – heck, Abba’s “Dancing Queen” didn’t come out til 1977, three years after the birth of disco!

Whatever you wanna call it, the few lucky people who’ve heard it all agree that it’s a true lost gem – so obscure and buried in the annals of rock history, I don’t think anyone’s ever even written about it before. It’s certainly not been reissued, and it’ll probably stay that way. So if you’re wondering where this one came from, you’re not alone. Now let’s show you what you’ve been missing.

The aforementioned opener, “6:30 A Sunday Morning”, charges out of the gate with not one but two quick references to Cream – the opening riff and chorus sound awfully close to “Badge” while the verses borrow from “I Feel Free.” There’s also a quick Beatles swipe, when they sing “Life is very short” nearly the same way Paul did in “We Can Work it Out,” and in just the first minute of the album, you’re wondering if these Swedes aren’t swiping more ideas than the design department of Ikea. But as the song progresses, it also relaxes a little, and soon the band stretches out into the loose, jammy acid rock vibe of West Coast bands like Spirit, Quicksilver Messenger Service and Mad River. Two excellent, smokin’ guitar solos later, and you wonder if any one who saw QMS play at the Avalon Ballroom in 1968 was thinking “prog rock.”

The remainder of Side 1 floats into jazz rock territory – but don’t get too excited, Henry Cow fans – we’re talking more of a hippie Monterey Pop communal jazz vibe, rather than a studied Canterbury prog jazz thing. Expect great things from a title like “General Mojo’s Well Laid Plan” and it won’t let you down – especially if you’re a fan of the pretty Jimi Hendrix ballads like “Little Wing” and “Angel.” This one’s strictly instrumental, though, which gives Opus III vocalist and guitarist Janne Schaffer more of an opportunity to fire off some killer fluid, liquidy guitar leads – in the grand Hendrix tradition. For “Natural Talking Boy”, the vibe is even looser, even jazzier, with a great rolling tribal rhythm section. If this sounded any more like a live Santana jam, it’d be pouring outside.

Maybe a title like “Movements of 8:08 Time Series Analyses” might smack of prog rock, and someone just casually reading off the song list without actually listening to this album could conceivably be misled into thinking this was some early 70’s Scandinavian space rock epic like Algarnas Tradgard or something. But they’d be wrong, just like the song title. It runs 8:13.

No, this is much headier stuff than that. And it all comes to a close with the trippiest, most psychedelic offering yet, “Evening Dream,” a cosmic brew of sound waves and real waves, and if ever a song could be described as “washing over you,” it’s this one. Thanks to some trippy cymbal crashes and the sound effects of waves crashing on the shore. It’s Country Joe and the Fish’s “Magoo” colliding with Pink Floyd’s “Echoes,” - the Avalon Ballroom meets the UFO Club and settles somewhere in Malmo. Some Benedictine monks show up for the performance and chant softly in the background, bringing to mind the more headier Yardbirds tracks, like “Turn to Earth” and “Still I’m Sad.” It’s all one giant aural brain wash, and even if it veers dangerously close to new age during the acoustic guitar solo, it bounces back to psych rock with a vengeance for the grand finale – all cymbal crashes, monk chants and crashing waves. The only prog rock in 1970 that was this f&*^ed up had a cow on the cover.

It’s a hard record to explain, just like it’s hard to explain the swarm of disembodied glowing yellow eyes that flank the band on the front cover. In the end, a simple label like “prog” or “psych” or even “underground rock” doesn’t even begin to explain the lysergic head zones and twisted terrains these three Swedes carve out. It’s just like Swedish meatballs. You’re not really how it’s made (and it’s probably best you don’t know), you just know it’s good when it’s finished."

Perius
This is a wonderful review that was on an ebay listing from 2007 NOT WRITTEN BY ME. Author unknown.

"This is why I hate labels. Not that this uber-rare Swedish album from 1970 by Opus III and Friends shows up very often – you’re likely to see six dozen original pressings of the July album for every one of these, and that’s not an exaggeration – but when it does, record dealers always – and I mean, always – label it “progressive rock.” Now I don’t know about you, but when I think prog-rock, I think of long instrumental passages, intricate time signatures and music that often incorporates elements of classical works and/or jazz fusion. Opus III and Friend’s first song, “6:30 A Sunday Morning” filches bits from two Cream songs in the first minute, and then references the Beatles. Now if that’s prog rock, then Roger Dean shoulda designed the cover for “Disraeli Gears.”



I’ll give you bands like the Nice and Flaming Youth, and albums like Yes’s “Time and A Word” – you could slap either a “prog” or a “psych” label on those and make a case both ways. And I’ll also concede that Opus III and Friends’ album came out in 1970, that notoriously transitional year between both genres. But one listen to this album and you’ll hear influences from Cream, the Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, Pink Floyd, the Yardbirds and Santana, only one of which you might classify as prog rock. Besides, the Swedes were always a little behind the trends – heck, Abba’s “Dancing Queen” didn’t come out til 1977, three years after the birth of disco!



Whatever you wanna call it, the few lucky people who’ve heard it all agree that it’s a true lost gem – so obscure and buried in the annals of rock history, I don’t think anyone’s ever even written about it before. It’s certainly not been reissued, and it’ll probably stay that way. So if you’re wondering where this one came from, you’re not alone. Now let’s show you what you’ve been missing.



The aforementioned opener, “6:30 A Sunday Morning”, charges out of the gate with not one but two quick references to Cream – the opening riff and chorus sound awfully close to “Badge” while the verses borrow from “I Feel Free.” There’s also a quick Beatles swipe, when they sing “Life is very short” nearly the same way Paul did in “We Can Work it Out,” and in just the first minute of the album, you’re wondering if these Swedes aren’t swiping more ideas than the design department of Ikea. But as the song progresses, it also relaxes a little, and soon the band stretches out into the loose, jammy acid rock vibe of West Coast bands like Spirit, Quicksilver Messenger Service and Mad River. Two excellent, smokin’ guitar solos later, and you wonder if any one who saw QMS play at the Avalon Ballroom in 1968 was thinking “prog rock.”



The remainder of Side 1 floats into jazz rock territory – but don’t get too excited, Henry Cow fans – we’re talking more of a hippie Monterey Pop communal jazz vibe, rather than a studied Canterbury prog jazz thing. Expect great things from a title like “General Mojo’s Well Laid Plan” and it won’t let you down – especially if you’re a fan of the pretty Jimi Hendrix ballads like “Little Wing” and “Angel.” This one’s strictly instrumental, though, which gives Opus III vocalist and guitarist Janne Schaffer more of an opportunity to fire off some killer fluid, liquidy guitar leads – in the grand Hendrix tradition. For “Natural Talking Boy”, the vibe is even looser, even jazzier, with a great rolling tribal rhythm section. If this sounded any more like a live Santana jam, it’d be pouring outside.



Maybe a title like “Movements of 8:08 Time Series Analyses” might smack of prog rock, and someone just casually reading off the song list without actually listening to this album could conceivably be misled into thinking this was some early 70’s Scandinavian space rock epic like Algarnas Tradgard or something. But they’d be wrong, just like the song title. It runs 8:13.



No, this is much headier stuff than that. And it all comes to a close with the trippiest, most psychedelic offering yet, “Evening Dream,” a cosmic brew of sound waves and real waves, and if ever a song could be described as “washing over you,” it’s this one. Thanks to some trippy cymbal crashes and the sound effects of waves crashing on the shore. It’s Country Joe and the Fish’s “Magoo” colliding with Pink Floyd’s “Echoes,” - the Avalon Ballroom meets the UFO Club and settles somewhere in Malmo. Some Benedictine monks show up for the performance and chant softly in the background, bringing to mind the more headier Yardbirds tracks, like “Turn to Earth” and “Still I’m Sad.” It’s all one giant aural brain wash, and even if it veers dangerously close to new age during the acoustic guitar solo, it bounces back to psych rock with a vengeance for the grand finale – all cymbal crashes, monk chants and crashing waves. The only prog rock in 1970 that was this f&*^ed up had a cow on the cover.



It’s a hard record to explain, just like it’s hard to explain the swarm of disembodied glowing yellow eyes that flank the band on the front cover. In the end, a simple label like “prog” or “psych” or even “underground rock” doesn’t even begin to explain the lysergic head zones and twisted terrains these three Swedes carve out. It’s just like Swedish meatballs. You’re not really how it’s made (and it’s probably best you don’t know), you just know it’s good when it’s finished."

Zeleence
Here's a link to the third track:

https://youtu.be/4tSWQviJz_Q

Vetalol
Here's a link to the third track:

https://youtu.be/4tSWQviJz_Q

Performer: Mills Brothers
Genre: Pop
[xfgiven_name]Title: [xfvalue_name]
[/xfgiven_name] [xfgiven_year]Released: [xfvalue_year]
[/xfgiven_year]
Performer: Prön Flåvürdik
Genre: Rock
[xfgiven_name]Title: [xfvalue_name]
[/xfgiven_name] [xfgiven_year]Released: [xfvalue_year]
[/xfgiven_year]
Performer: Tommy Dorsey And His Orchestra
Genre: Jazz
[xfgiven_name]Title: [xfvalue_name]
[/xfgiven_name] [xfgiven_year]Released: [xfvalue_year]
[/xfgiven_year]
Elly Ney - Unvergessen Album

Elly Ney - Unvergessen

Neo-Classical
Performer: Elly Ney
Genre: Classical
[xfgiven_name]Title: [xfvalue_name]
[/xfgiven_name] [xfgiven_year]Released: [xfvalue_year]
[/xfgiven_year]
Performer: Various
Genre: Jazz
[xfgiven_name]Title: [xfvalue_name]
[/xfgiven_name] [xfgiven_year]Released: [xfvalue_year]
[/xfgiven_year]
Performer: Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy - Daniel Barenboim
Genre: Classical
[xfgiven_name]Title: [xfvalue_name]
[/xfgiven_name] [xfgiven_year]Released: [xfvalue_year]
[/xfgiven_year]
Performer: Milt Jackson, Frank Wess, Kenny Clarke, Hank Jones, Eddie Jones
Genre: Jazz
[xfgiven_name]Title: [xfvalue_name]
[/xfgiven_name] [xfgiven_year]Released: [xfvalue_year]
[/xfgiven_year]
Performer: Robert Stolz & The Berliner Symphoniker
Genre: Classical
[xfgiven_name]Title: [xfvalue_name]
[/xfgiven_name] [xfgiven_year]Released: [xfvalue_year]
[/xfgiven_year]
Performer: Chopin - Paul Douliez / Jan Panenka / Valentina Kameníková
Genre: Classical
[xfgiven_name]Title: [xfvalue_name]
[/xfgiven_name] [xfgiven_year]Released: [xfvalue_year]
[/xfgiven_year]
Performer: Charles Munch Conducting Paris Conservatory Orchestra, Tchaikovsky
Genre: Classical
[xfgiven_name]Title: [xfvalue_name]
[/xfgiven_name] [xfgiven_year]Released: [xfvalue_year]
[/xfgiven_year]